Polaroid 20 X 24 Self-Portrait Series __


Polaroid 20 X 24 Self-Portrait Series
__

Painted Black & White Self-Portrait Series ––


Painted Black & White Self-Portrait Series
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My Sparkling Self Polaroid Super Shooter Polacolor __


My Sparkling Self
Polaroid Super Shooter Polacolor
__

Zip-to-ZZZ Series Painted Polaroid SX-70 __


Zip-to-ZZZ Series
Painted Polaroid SX-70
__

Painted Polaroid SX-70 Self-Portraits Series __  


Painted Polaroid SX-70 Self-Portraits Series
__

 

Painted Polaroid SX-70 Series ––


Painted Polaroid SX-70 Series
––

Painted Black & White Self-Portraits Series (with applied color) __


Painted Black & White Self-Portraits Series
(with applied color)

__

Painted Color on Color Self Portrait Series __


Painted Color on Color Self Portrait Series
__

Black & White Abstractions __


Black & White Abstractions
__

Photo-litho Self-Portrait Series ––


Photo-litho Self-Portrait Series
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Polaroid 20 X 24 Abstractions ––


Polaroid 20 X 24 Abstractions
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Early Work:
1970s–1990s


Photography’s ability to depict “reality” has been one of its most praised and valued qualities. Faith in the believability of the photograph led to the assumption that the appearance of an object somehow revealed its essence. This belief is particularly strong in our attitudes toward the portrait and its supposed ability to express the inner state and thoughts of the sitter. Yet, the appearance of discernible truth beyond the surface characteristics of the subject is an illusion. The photographic portrait is able to convey only clues to the sitter’s thoughts. It is understandable, then, that an artist interested in expressing internal states of mind would look for ways to extend the connotative power of the image. Ellen Carey combines the realism of the photograph with the evocative power of paint and collage to create an image that not only records appearance but suggests essence. (more)

Read Complete Essay by Willis Hartshorn